How to Crochet Hexagons

by | May 26, 2018

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Learn to crochet a Hexagon!  Crochet Hexagons are quick and easy to make, and can be used in many types of projects.

These motifs can be sewn together to make striking geometric designs. Use individual hexagons as appliques, coasters, dish scrubbies, or face scrubbies.

How to Crochet a Basic Hexagon

by Yay For Yarn

Click Here to add this pattern to your Ravelry queue, favorites, and library.

Skill Level: Advanced Beginner

You will need:

Yarn of your choice (amount will depend on yarn weight category and desired finished size)

Crochet Hook (in a size that is appropriate for the yarn you are using)

Scissors

Yarn Needle or Blunt Tapestry Needle

Stitch Marker (I prefer the Split-Ring type for this)

Gauge will depend on the yarn and hook you are using. Using a hook size that is appropriate for the thickness of your yarn will yield the best result.

Abbreviations:

st: stitch     sts: stitches     beg: beginning     ch: chain      sc: single crochet     ea: each

The size of the hexagon is customizable. Once you have completed round 3, you can stop then, or after any of the following rounds.

Begin by making a Magic Loop.

Round 1: ch 1, 5 sc into magic loop. Hold onto the chain from beg of round and pull yarn tail to close magic loop. You should have 6 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Tip: Crochet over the yarn tail as you go on following rounds to avoid weaving it in later.

Round 2: 2 sc in ea of nxt 6 sts. You should have 12 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Round 3: *sc in nxt st, 2 sc in nxt st*. Repeat between *and* 5 more times around. You should have 18 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Round 4: *sc in ea of nxt 2 sts, 2sc in nxt st*. Repeat between *and* 5 more times around. You should have 24 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Round 5: *sc in ea of nxt 3 sts, 2sc in nxt st*. Repeat between *and* 5 more times around. You should have 30 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Round 6: *sc in ea of nxt 4 sts, 2 sc in nxt st*. Repeat between *and* 5 more times around. You should have 36 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Round 7: *sc in ea of nxt 5 sts, 2 sc in nxt st*. Repeat between *and* 5 more times around. You should have 42 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

Round 8: *sc in ea of nxt 6 sts, 2 sc in nxt st*. Repeat between *and* 5 more times around. You should have 48 sts. Place marker in loop that is currently on the hook.

If you want to continue to make the hexagon larger, you can. On each following round, you should add one more stitch to the “repeat between *and*” sequence. So, the next round would repeat *sc in ea of nxt 7 sts, 2 sc in nxt st* around, the following round would repeat *sc in ea of nxt 8 sts, 2 sc in nxt st* around, et cetera, until the hexagon is as large as you like. Each round should always have 6 more sts than the previous round.

When your hexagon has reached the desired size, remove marker. There will be a little “dip” in the edge of your hexagon where the beginning / end of the round is. Sc in the nxt st or nxt few sts until the side of the hexagon appears straight. Slip stitch in nxt st and tie off. Feel free to leave a long tail if you would like to sew your hexagons together. For best results, block your hexagons with the method of your choice. I used acrylic yarn, so I chose to pin my hexagons to a pressing board and hold a steaming iron 2”-3” over the surface, until steam had penetrated the hexagon. If you are using a different fiber, you may prefer to wet block your work.

This pattern is intended for your personal use only. You may not share it, copy it, sell it, give it away, or mass-produce the finished product. However, you may sell the finished items on a small scale, as long as you convey in your item description that you used a Yay For Yarn pattern. Yay For Yarn Copyright© 2018- Current. All patterns and photos are owned by Yay For Yarn.

60-degree triangles fit perfectly into spaces between hexagons.  See my free tutorial for crocheting 60-degree triangles here.

What would you make from a hexagon?

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If squeezing yarn, collecting yarn, or making stuff from yarn is your thing, you’ll feel right at home here. My mission is to share the joy of yarn crafts with makers of all skill levels by creating clear, thoroughly-explained video tutorials and modern, approachable projects. So, whether you’re a newbie or you’ve been yarning for years, stick around and check out some of my FREE patterns & tutorials!
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Yay For Yarn

Hi! Thanks for stopping by. Knitting and crochet are my passion, and I love helping others create beautiful things from yarn. If you enjoyed this post, why not check out some of my other free patterns, tips, and tutorials? Happy Yarning!

1 Comment

  1. Maria Beatriz Garcia, R. N.

    You are fantastic. Thank you for sharing. God bless you and your family.

    Reply

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